Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy


*** About PCSP: click on ABOUT button above and look in Policies.

*** Instructions for Authors and Author Guidelines: click on ABOUT button above and look in Submissions.   

*** For best viewing of this web site, use Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox, or Safari.
To open the pdf files requires Acrobat version 8.0 or higher (see below). 

November 11, 2017 -- From the Editor 

ANNOUNCING THE PUBLICATION OF OUR 50th ISSUE (Vol. 13, Module 3)

Maria and Andrea: Comparing Positive and Negative Outcome Cases in an Online, Clinician-Guided, Self-Help Intervention for Panic Disorder 

***  Amalia Ciuca, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania 

*** Thomas Berger, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

*** Mircea Miclea, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania 

Daydreamer and Night Owl: Comparing Positive and Negative Outcome Cases in an Online, Clinician-Guided, Self-Help Intervention for Social Anxiety Disorder

*** Ava Schulz, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland  

*** Alessia Vincent, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

*** Thomas Berger, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

Commentaries  

*** Tracy Eells, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

*** Franz Caspar, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

*** Alexandra Woods, Christopher Stults, Rachel Terry, & Simon Rego, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY

     

For Table of Contents and access to articles: go to bottom of this page; or click on "Current" button at top of this page. 

EDITOR'S NOTE:

            In the 1970s and ‘80s, cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) stimulated the growth of the psychological self-help book movement. With the great expansion of computer access and the Internet in the 1990s, this movement was then transformed into online-based, CBT modules consisting of text, audio, and video. Called “Internet-Based CBT,” or “ICBT” for short, this development has led to a skyrocketing of ICBT research, with “more than 100 controlled studies in the field of anxiety disorders, depression, and other conditions [that] have shown promising results” (Schulz, Vincent, & Berger, pp. 217-218).  

        This issue of PCSP focuses on case studies involving a hybrid of traditional, face-to-face CBT, on the one hand, and of computer-only ICBT, on the other. This hybrid consists of ICBT that is guided by a clinician, interacting with the client either via real-time video sessions (Ciuca, Berger, & Miclea), or by asynchronous, email communication (Schulz et al.).  In the words of one of the Commentators, the involvement of a clinician allows for the documentation of “rich interactions between the client and the therapist guide. The ‘computer’ did not seem to block the clinical processes that are seen when only the client and therapist are involved in the treatment” (Eells, p. 262). 

        In the target articles, Ciuca et al. compare the process and outcomes of two panic disorder clients: “Maria,” with a positive outcome, and “Andrea,” with a negative outcome. And Schulz et al.  compare the process and outcomes of two social anxiety disorder clients: “Daydreamer,” with a positive outcome, and “Night Owl,” with a negative outcome. For both sets of authors, these cases were drawn from the clinician-guided arm of a randomized controlled trial.  

        The Commentaries view the case studies from a wide variety of perspectives, including detailed case comparisons of the roles of specific and common factors in the good-outcome and poor-outcome cases; the practical advantages of online, clinician-guided treatment;  the role of the therapist alliance; the broad reach of online therapy; the important complementary role that systematic case studies play in enhancing the knowledge that emerges from RCTs; suggestions for improving ICBT interventions for anxiety disorders; implications for implementation and dissemination; and ethical and safety considerations.   

 

PCSP is Abstracted in:

** PsycINFO (APA)

** Academic Search Complete (EBSCO) 

Conceptual Overview

A conceptual overview of the journal is available by going to the About PCSP link found by clicking on the ABOUT link above and looking under Policies.  

Access to Current Articles

The current article series or "Module" is available on the right side of this home page. As shown, articles are available in HTML format for the Abstract and bibliographic information, and in PDF format for full text. This format requires the following plug-in: Acrobat Plug-in (use version 8.0 or above)

Editorial Board

** View. View by clicking on the EDITORIAL BOARD link at the top of the page. Along with their names and affiliations, samples of the Editorial Board members' scholarly, clinical, and research accomplishments are briefly summarized.

Call for Papers

** Manuscripts. Two types of manuscripts are desired: those consisting of one or more case studies, and those consisting of case method articles.

** Suggested Author Guidelines. These can be found by clicking on the link Instructions for Authors, as described above. Note that we suggest 11 common headings for case study manuscripts:
1. Case Context and Method
2. The Client
3. Guiding Conception with Research and Clinical Experience Support
4. Assessment of the Client's Problems, Goals, Strengths, and History.
5. Formulation and Treatment Plan
6. Course of Therapy
7. Therapy Monitoring and Use of Feedback Information
8. Concluding Evaluation of the Therapy's Process and Outcome
9. References
10. Tables (optional)
11. Figures (optional)
Also note that on the Instructions for Authors page,  there are substantive guidelines within each heading. However, these should be viewed as suggestions only, not as requirements.

** Author Policies.For author policies about manuscript submission, copyright, and confidentiality, click on the link Authors Guidelines, as described above. 

** Format. In the initial phase of the journal, manuscripts should be submitted if possible as Word documents using the manuscript style guidelines of the American Psychological Association.

** Submitting Manuscripts. During the initial phase of the journal, authors should submit manuscripts by emailing a Word file to the Editor, Daniel Fishman, at DFish96198@aol.com.

** Note: the PCSP web site has an automated method for submitting manuscripts, which will be activated after the initial phase of the journal.

** Questions. Any questions about manuscript ideas or formats should be addressed to the Editor at DFish96198@aol.com.

Searching

Current and past articles can be searched for full-text or otherwise by clicking on the link for SEARCH at the top of the page.     

PCSP Sponsors

PCSP is sponsored by the Rutgers Graduate School of Applied & Professional Psychology, and by the Rutgers University Libraries (RUL). To learn about the RUL's philosophy on open-access, online, peer-reviewed journal publishing, click on the ABOUT link at the top of the page, go to Policies, and then click on Open Access Policy.   

Contact

Contact. To get in touch with the PCSP Editor and webmaster, click on the the ABOUT link at the top of the page, go to People, and then click on Contact.   

Vol 13, No 3 (2017)

Table of Contents

Case Study

Maria and Andrea: Comparing Positive and Negative Outcome Cases in an Online, Clinician-Guided, Self-Help Intervention for Panic Disorder Abstract PDF
Amalia M. Ciuca, Thomas Berger, Mircea Miclea 173-216
Daydreamer and Night Owl: Comparing Positive and Negative Outcome Cases in an Online, Clinician-Guided, Self-Help Intervention for Social Anxiety Disorder Abstract PDF
Ava Schulz, Alessia Vincent, Thomas Berger 217-252
Why Do Some Psychotherapy Clients Get Better Than Others? Abstract PDF
Tracy D Eells 253-264
Case Studies of Clinician-Guided, Online Therapy: Towards a Fuller Understanding of How and Under What Conditions Such Therapy Works Abstract PDF
Franz Caspar 265-270
Strengths and Limitations of Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Anxiety Disorders Abstract PDF
Alexandra P Woods, Christopher B Stults, Rachel L Terry, Simon A Rego 271-283